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Competition Results 2015

2015 CCS Atrial Fibrillation Research Award

The Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) is pleased to announce the results of the 2015 Atrial Fibrillation (AF) Research Award competition. This program was created to encourage clinical, health systems and population health research in the field of AF and is open to all Canadian researchers. Below is a listing of newly awarded CCS AF Research Awards.

3 awards have been granted - 11% of all full proposals received. Awards are $100,000 in total for projects up to 3 years in length.
These 3 new awards represent a total investment of $300,000.

We are pleased that all projects are being funded to their full panel recommended amounts. Note that awards include funds for salaries, supplies, and/or equipment. The start date for these awards is July 1, 2015. Only the Principal Investigator is named in this listing. Co-Principal Investigators, Co-Applicants and/or Additional Authors may also be associated with these grants.

Award winners:

Principal Investigator: Dr. Marc Deyell

University of British Columbia
Proposal Title: Efficacy, health care utilization rates and safety of a same-day discharge protocol for AF ablations.
Award amount: $100,000
Term: July 2015 - July 2017

Summaries of funded projects

Atrial fibrillation (AF) catheter ablation is the most common complex ablation. It is a highly effective, yet resource intensive therapy for highly symptomatic AF. With the increased prevalence and age-adjusted incidence of AF ablation, the volume of ablation procedures in Canada will continue to rise, with increased demands on our health care system.

This retrospective cohort study will consist of all patients undergoing ablation from 2010 to 2014 at two large centres in BC. The study aims to determine the feasibility of a same-day discharge protocol after atrial fibrillation ablation and identify patient-level predictors for failure of same-day discharge; compare health care utilization, up to 30 days post-procedure, between same-day discharge versus routine hospital admission after atrial fibrillation ablation; and, compare safety outcomes, up to 30 days post-procedure, between same-day discharge versus routine hospital admission after atrial fibrillation ablation.

Principal Investigator: Dr. Duncan Stewart

Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
Proposal Title: Circulating microRNAs as non-invasive biomarkers to improve the diagnosis of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.
Award amount: $100,000
Term: July 2015 - July 2016

Summaries of funded projects

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of the most common, yet preventable causes of ischemic stroke. Early detection can improve management and reduce the risk of stroke; however, the prompt diagnosis of paroxysmal AF (PAF) represents a significant challenge. PAF may occur transiently and without symptoms, and there are currently no clinically established biomarkers to facilitate diagnosis. MicroRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNA molecules that have more recently been shown to circulate in blood, and disease-specific alterations in their circulating extracellular levels have been reported in diverse pathological settings. This study will identify circulating miRNAs that could function as non-invasive diagnostic tools to facilitate early detection and effective management of paroxysmal AF, which in turn may help to prevent future cardioembolic events. This study will also provide the necessary framework to support interrogation of candidate miRNA biomarkers in future patient cohorts by this and other investigative labs.

Principal Investigator: Dr. Peter Loewen

University of British Columbia
Proposal Title: Long-term persistence and adherence with new oral anticoagulants vs. warfarin in newly-anticoagulated atrial fibrillation patients.
Award amount: $100,000
Term: July 2015 - July 2017

Summaries of funded projects

Persistence and adherence with warfarin therapy are associated with stroke prevention efficacy in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. Although the new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are widely prescribed, there are gaps in our understanding of how persistent and adherent patients are to NOACs in real-world practice, how they compare to warfarin and each other, and what patient factors are associated with persistence and adherence to NOACs. This multi-center prospective observational cohort study will resolve these gaps. Findings may better enable clinicians and patients to select therapies with a higher probability of treatment success and generate vital knowledge for patient programs to maximize persistence and adherence and for developing medication use and coverage policies that maximize the stroke- reducing potential of these therapies.

 


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  • Principal Investigator: Dr. Duncan Stewart
  • Principal Investigator: Dr. Marc Deyell
  • Principal Investigator: Dr. Peter Loewen

Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
Proposal Title: Circulating microRNAs as non-invasive biomarkers to improve the diagnosis of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.
Award amount: $100,000
Term: July 2015 - July 2016

Summaries of funded projects

Atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of the most common, yet preventable causes of ischemic stroke. Early detection can improve management and reduce the risk of stroke; however, the prompt diagnosis of paroxysmal AF (PAF) represents a significant challenge. PAF may occur transiently and without symptoms, and there are currently no clinically established biomarkers to facilitate diagnosis. MicroRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNA molecules that have more recently been shown to circulate in blood, and disease-specific alterations in their circulating extracellular levels have been reported in diverse pathological settings. This study will identify circulating miRNAs that could function as non-invasive diagnostic tools to facilitate early detection and effective management of paroxysmal AF, which in turn may help to prevent future cardioembolic events. This study will also provide the necessary framework to support interrogation of candidate miRNA biomarkers in future patient cohorts by this and other investigative labs.

University of British Columbia
Proposal Title: Efficacy, health care utilization rates and safety of a same-day discharge protocol for AF ablations.
Award amount: $100,000
Term: July 2015 - July 2017

Summaries of funded projects

Atrial fibrillation (AF) catheter ablation is the most common complex ablation. It is a highly effective, yet resource intensive therapy for highly symptomatic AF. With the increased prevalence and age-adjusted incidence of AF ablation, the volume of ablation procedures in Canada will continue to rise, with increased demands on our health care system.

This retrospective cohort study will consist of all patients undergoing ablation from 2010 to 2014 at two large centres in BC. The study aims to determine the feasibility of a same-day discharge protocol after atrial fibrillation ablation and identify patient-level predictors for failure of same-day discharge; compare health care utilization, up to 30 days post-procedure, between same-day discharge versus routine hospital admission after atrial fibrillation ablation; and, compare safety outcomes, up to 30 days post-procedure, between same-day discharge versus routine hospital admission after atrial fibrillation ablation.

University of British Columbia
Proposal Title: Long-term persistence and adherence with new oral anticoagulants vs. warfarin in newly-anticoagulated atrial fibrillation patients.
Award amount: $100,000
Term: July 2015 - July 2017

Summaries of funded projects

Persistence and adherence with warfarin therapy are associated with stroke prevention efficacy in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. Although the new oral anticoagulants (NOACs) are widely prescribed, there are gaps in our understanding of how persistent and adherent patients are to NOACs in real-world practice, how they compare to warfarin and each other, and what patient factors are associated with persistence and adherence to NOACs. This multi-center prospective observational cohort study will resolve these gaps. Findings may better enable clinicians and patients to select therapies with a higher probability of treatment success and generate vital knowledge for patient programs to maximize persistence and adherence and for developing medication use and coverage policies that maximize the stroke- reducing potential of these therapies.