CCS News

New pan-Canadian report provides latest snapshot of cardiovascular care outcomes for PCI and Cardiac Surgery

A new report released jointly by the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) and the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) offers clinicians and health decision makers critical, pan-Canadian data on cardiac patient outcomes that could help improve the quality of in-hospital care.

The 2018 Cardiac Care Quality Indicators (CCQI) Report provides pan-Canadian comparable information on mortality and readmission outcomes following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) and aortic valve replacement (AVR), using data from the most recent reporting year (2016-2017).
 
The report focuses on six outcome indicators and one volume measure:
•    30-Day In-Hospital Mortality After Isolated CABG
•    30-Day In-Hospital Mortality After CABG and AVR
•    30 Day In-Hospital Mortality After Isolated AVR
•    30-Day Readmission Rate After Isolated CABG
•    30-Day In-Hospital Mortality After PCI
•    30-Day Readmission Rate After PCI
•    PCI Volume (measure not risk-adjusted)

Risk-adjusted results are reported at the Canadian, provincial and cardiac care centre levels, to help support quality improvement in PCI and Cardiac Surgery.

The CCS is working to ensure that the report is widely distributed, including targeted outreach to clinicians and administrators at cardiac care centres across the county. Following review of the 2018 report, the CCS will gather insight on report uptake and any specific steps hospitals have undertaken to discuss and study the report results. This will support the CCS in understanding the impact of the report and identify next steps. 

 
Results released through the inaugural public report in 2017 were based on three years of pooled data (2013–2014, 2014–2015 and 2015–2016).

This second public installment of the CCQI Report represents an important step in the CCS’ journey towards improving transparency and quality of cardiac care across Canada.

(posted June 16, 2018)

Launching the 2018 CCS-Bayer Vascular Resident Awards

The Dr. Charles Kerr Award was created in 2017 through the Canadian Cardiovascular Society Academy (CCSA) in honor of Dr. Charles Kerr who passed away the same year. The Dr. Charles Kerr Award is given annually to up to three residents that epitomize Charlie’s goals for the cardiovascular community and strive to embody his legacy through encouraging and advocating for those in need of assistance or support.

The call for this award is now open. The deadline to submit is July 31, 2018.

For more information, click here.

(posted June 16, 2018)

2018 Dr. Charles Kerr Award

This award is intended for residents in a Canadian clinical training program (PGY 4-6) for, but not limited to, adult or pediatric cardiology, cardiac or vascular surgery for a research project on any topic related to thrombosis, anticoagulation, stroke, or atrial fibrillation. Three grants are available: $20,000, $15,000, $10,000, and a bonus of $5,000 for best presentation at CCC 2018. Deadline to submit is September 10, 2018. Submissions must be made here.  Please forward this email to your residents and urge them to apply.

(posted June 16, 2018)

Interest in international electives heighten among cardiovascular trainees

The May 2018 edition of the Canadian Journal of Cardiology spotlights Dr. Shelia Klassen (Massachusetts General Hospital) and Dr. Debra Isaac’s (Libin Cardiovascular Institute) perspective on international electives for cardiovascular trainees. The article acknowledges the value that international partnerships and exchanges offer to training practitioners, as well as the barriers to pursuing these opportunities. Learn more.

(posted June 16, 2018)

Thank you - What great memories!

Anne

Wow, I cannot believe that 19 years has passed by with the Canadian Cardiovascular Society! Before I joined the CCS, I knew little about the impact of professional associations, let alone the specific role of this one. What a learning experience it has been working with such a dedicated group of members from across the country and staff right here in Ottawa.

“Leadership. Knowledge. Community” really are the three words that embody the characteristics of this organization.

When I look back, the number of areas where the CCS has lead in cardiovascular care or specialty medicine is significant. Be it the development of wait time benchmarks for cardiovascular services, the initial RCPSC diploma programs for sub-specialty areas, Choosing Wisely engagement, or the publication of quality measurement reports, CCS has been leading the way in Canada.

In the areas of knowledge exchange and professional development the CCS has also expanded its role and opportunities for member meaning and engagement—and this continues to grow. The Canadian Cardiovascular Congress and CCS guidelines and position statements, along with many tools to disseminate their recommendations, are now core to the CCS. The Trainee Review Programs enabled by the CCS and the CCS Academy also address unique member needs—and are highly valued.   Of course, I could not forget the Canadian Journal of Cardiology, purchased in 2010 from a small regional publisher, is now available globally and has grown its impact factor from 1.3 to 4.4.

When I started with the CCS, the organization had just over 1000 members. Today that number is over 2200 and the needs of those members has evolved over the years. Many CCS members are also members of one of our eleven CCS Affiliate organizations. These organizations allow for further sub-specialty focus, supported by the CCS, while being part of the larger cardiovascular community. Together, the CCS and these organizations have enriched the program of the Congress, combined voices on advocacy issues and collaborated on international initiatives.

My deepest thanks to all CCS members for everything they do. At any given time, CCS members are highly engaged in educational programme development, committee or writing panel work, editorial review, or advocacy. It has been wonderful working with such committed individuals—their energy ignites the organization!

I especially want to express my gratitude to each of the CCS and CCSA Presidents who’ve served during my time as CEO, and to everyone who has served on Council. Collectively, our membership gives their time and talents to contribute immensely to cardiovascular health, care and system change in Canada.

I also want to recognize and thank the CCS staff, many whom have worked here for several years. The staff team works hard to advance the CCS agenda. Their efforts and dedication combined with the memberships’ enthusiasm impacts on cardiovascular health and care in Canada.

The pursuit of excellence never ends. After almost two decades with CCS, I can say that it has been a great ride. If I could give any parting words of advice for my successor, it would be to capitalize on the ideas and energy of our members and staff to take the CCS to the next level.

Yours truly,

Anne

Anne Ferguson

CEO, Canadian Cardiovascular Society

(posted May 16, 2018)

New pan-Canadian report on cardiovascular care outcomes to be released May 31

On May 31, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) and the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) will jointly release a new pan-Canadian report on mortality and readmission outcomes following PCI and Cardiac Surgery. The release of this report will represent an important step in the CCS’ journey towards improving transparency and quality of cardiac care across Canada.

The 2018 Cardiac Care Quality Indicators (CCQI) Report uses data from the most recent reporting year (2016-2017) to report six outcome indicators and one volume measure:

  • 30-Day In-Hospital Mortality After Isolated CABG
  • 30-Day In-Hospital Mortality After CABG and AVR
  • 30-Day In-Hospital Mortality After Isolated AVR
  • 30-Day Readmission Rate After Isolated CABG
  • 30-Day In-Hospital Mortality After PCI
  • 30-Day Readmission Rate After PCI
  • PCI Volume (measure not risk-adjusted)

To read the inaugural 2017 CCQI Report, which included results on mortality and readmission outcomes based on three years of pooled data (2013-2014, 2014-2015 and 2015-2016), click here.

To access the latest installment of the CCQI Report on May 31, visit ccs.ca.

(posted May 16, 2018)

Survey Reminder: Tell us what advocacy tools and health policy issues matter to you

Last year, the CCS and many of its members engaged in a number of federal-focused advocacy activities, primarily towards the goal of securing sustainable funding for the CCS Quality Project.

Now, the CCS is looking to its membership to help inform future advocacy activities, resources and areas of focus. Not only are CCS members experts in the field of cardiovascular patient care, but they are constituents and ultimately, voters; who have the capacity to influence the health landscape.

We ask that you please complete our five-minute surveyto share your feedback on what cardiovascular care topic areas matter to you; how you perceive your role as an advocate for health system change; and what advocacy activities you have engaged in, in support of the CCS Quality Project.

Deadline to complete the survey is May 11, 2018.

(posted May 16, 2018)